Thursday, April 21, 2016

It goes without saying.


A day for the PONs monthly ear plucking and cleaning. Sophie pretends to object but relishes being the centre of attention. Bob suffers in stoic big brotherly silence. Afterwards they get given a slice of carrot as recompense.


The weather has changed. From hot and cloudless to windy and overcast. In fact very windy. The swarming bees have disappeared. The PONs chase blackbirds. It goes without saying the blackbirds are untroubled.


During the night the wild boar have been digging up the grass verges along the lane with their tusks. Bob is kept on his harness for his mid-morning walk. Too many local dogs have taken on the wild boars and lost.


White asparagus at $6.50 a kilo now cheaper than the green asparagus at $7.00


Fresh peas make an appearance. A pain to shuck but the taste is worth it. Sophie adores fresh peas. Bob thinks they're a lot of bother.


Another quiet day in deepest, deepest France profonde.

And here a reminder that Scottish island life requires multi-tasking : http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/20/one-man-and-his-jobs-keep-a-tiny-orkney-island-going/



15 comments:

  1. Wild boar tusks could shred a PON in an instant methinks? What do white asparagus taste like? We don't get them here. Shucking peas we a ritual of my childhood, done on the back step in the warm sun, as was the feeding of same to an immensely enthusiastic pony! Ah, a lovely memory!

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    1. They could shred not only a PON but a PONs owner. White asparagus is softer and sweeter. The Swedes and German love it with ham and boiled potatoes. When it's this fresh we eat it on its own with butter. Interestingly PONs don't like it but they do like carefully prepared artichoke hearts.

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    2. They could shred not only a PON but a PONs owner. White asparagus is softer and sweeter. The Swedes and German love it with ham and boiled potatoes. When it's this fresh we eat it on its own with butter. Interestingly PONs don't like it but they do like carefully prepared artichoke hearts.

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  2. Those fresh peas look delicious - surely even Bob is tempted, if they are shelled for him ! The white asparagus looks wonderful - ours only ever comes pre-packed or in jars - not the same at all.

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    1. The joy of France - fresh seasonal produce, grown locally. Balances out having to deal with the bureaucracy.

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  3. Bob is looking delightful windswept.

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    1. The wild look. For PONs it comes naturally.

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  4. Lulu hates having her ears plucked and kicks up a tremendous fuss.
    I notice that your ceanothus is in bloom. We miss the one we had in our UK garden which wouldn't be in bloom for several weeks yet.

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    1. Everything is in bloom a month earlier than usual. The El Nino effect ?

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  5. Yum - we love asparagus season. Strawberries will be next - you guys are lucky!!

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  6. I really enjoyed the article about Mr. Muir - is he a relative?

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  7. Not sure about asparagus that is not colored green. Does it taste any different I wonder? It looks rather windy there!

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  8. We've only seen white asparagus in jars here too - the fresh ones do sound delicious.
    Shelling fresh peas brings back childhood memories of sitting in the garden with bowls on laps. All very good except if you find a weevil in one!

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  9. We thoroughly enjoyed the Billy Muir article; what a remarkable man! The ceanothus is blooming in Northern California, too; yours is a grand color. The picture of Bob facing the wind is a favorite.

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