Thursday, July 7, 2016

Neural linkages.


We're up and out before six. Sophie's neural linkages take a little time to connect. She gives me her ' Do you know what time it is ? ' look.

Climbing back up the hill towards the village we pass a combine harvester hard at work. We double our pace to pass this large yellow chaff spewing monster as quickly as possible. Sophie makes sure that I'm positioned between her and this strange beast.


There is a PON parade at the front door. Big brother enters first. His sister overtakes him in the hallway and is the first into the kitchen. Breakfast is enjoyed.


Carrot, Pepper and Tomato, Olive Tapenade and Lobster Bisque macaroons on sale in the traiteur on the market square.


There can be no doubt that high summer is here. The International aisle in the supermarket has been stacked in anticipation of the arrival of foreign tourists. An annual event. The American section displays Jelly Beans, Peanut Butter, Chocolate Chip Cookies. two packets of Marshmallows and what appears to be a revoltingly pink coloured Marshmallow Spread called 'Fluff'. Angus is at a loss as to when and under what circumstances you might eat 'Fluff'. If eat is what indeed you do with it. There are also some jars of Maple Syrup but they have been stacked in the 'English' section.


Let it not be said that life here in our little corner of paradise is anything other than cosmopolitan.


25 comments:

  1. I remember marshmallow fluff. Even as a child, I wouldn't eat it. But it was only in white, back in the day. That it exists in pink boggles the mind.
    You should buy a jar and try some -- in the interests of scientific and culinary investigation, of course.

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    1. It's on my to do list. At the bottom.

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  2. Aah, I see the supermarket is all geared up to give our transatlantic visitors a taste of the "real" France ! Is this the first time "Fluff" has made it to this side of the pond?
    If the pretty coloured macaroons are savoury and veggie flavoured, what on earth are those grey ones lurking on the left? Tarmac?

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    1. Quite why any American products should make it onto the shelves, as this little corner of France receives a bare handful every year, is a mystery.

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  3. With Fluff, of course, you make a "Fluffernutter," which Wikipedia describes as "a sandwich made with peanut butter and marshmallow fluff usually served on white bread." From reading your blog these many yeasr, I doubt this is your thing, but when my daughter first saw Fluff at the American sale at our local Japanese supermarket, oh boy, we had to have it! Good taste won out in the end, however, and after about two Fluffernutters, the jar was left to moulder in the back of the refrigerator.

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    1. Thank you for providing clarity on how one should eat 'Fluff'. Perhaps I've become just a little too staid to go and make a 'Fluffernutter ' ? What the French make of all of this can be guessed at.

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  4. Never mind marshmallow fluff. Lobster Bisque macaroons???!

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  5. I'm with Bouncing Bertie--those macarons!!!!
    I admit to having brought back a jar of Fluff once. It can be used to make very fluffy frosting for cakes--a shortcut for Swiss meringue. I wasn't impressed with the result.

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  6. I've never had a "fluffernutter," and I'm okay with that. My Mom used to occasionally buy "fluff" and we'd put it into hot chocolate, it's like a marshmallow, which is what its taste is similar too. People do other things with it, but I am not one of them. Now the Pepperidge Farm cookies (pronounced pep-ridge) and the jelly-belly-beans, that's a whole other story, good choices, but I'd skip all of them to go to your bakery!

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    1. Will buy some jelly beans the next time I'm shopping !

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  7. Marshmallow Fluff is a New England stable. We grew up on peanut butter and fluff sandwiches. I have friends who's children have served in the military and the one thing they always ask for is fluff in their care packages!

    Bea

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  8. In New England, A Fluffer-nutter was a staple of happy five year old life since the commercial touting them was on TV constantly! Yes, also used on Hot Chocolate.
    But I remember it fondly as being used in the filling of my Mom's recipe foe Black Moons aka Whoopie Pies. An original whoopee pie is 2 thin round (cookie shaped) deep chocolate cakes filled with a thick white fluffy filling put together like an Oreo or an ice cream sandwich. As I found when I was a Mom and was baking them for my family, they were a pain to make and consumed as soon as they were assembled. One of those many times when you realized what a loving Mom you were blessed with :)

    Angus, if you could make yourself get within five feet of that pink Fluff, you may find that it is strawberry flavored, thus the pink. Also, I think we need to turn the Font's font of knowledge toward solving the Brexit mess. My 401K and I will thank her :). My love to the PONS! Pam in NH

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  9. I do not know anything about Fluff, but I can identify with Sophie's early morning neural linkages!

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  10. The flavour choices of the macarons are interesting and for a likely more refined palate, no? They sell the jars of Fluff here in Canada - marshmallow colored but I have never seen the pink ones for sale. I have never, ever tasted it either.

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    1. You have to wonder what goes into it. Is anything natural ? Certainly not the colour.

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  11. What a tempting array of culinary delights you have presented, Angus, including macaroons in flavors that never occurred to me. (Yes, what in the world are those grey ones?) Perhaps Sophie would eat Fluff.

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    1. Sophie would almost certainly love Fluff.

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  12. All I can say is that never, in the history of ever, have I seen a jar of "Fluff" on the local market shelves here in Virginia.

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    1. I'm surprised to discover that CC #3 knows what Fluff is.

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    1. Maybe ? Which hints at the fact that I don't know what Spume is .

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  14. The new englanders have it correct. A fluffernutter on wonder bread (white) with hot chocolate and a spoon of the fluff. A good winter lunch. Also, the middle of a whoopie pie and used for frosting. Now, bet if you look on the jar, there's a recipie for easy fudge!! It's how I learned to make fudge. i kind of remember seeing pink fluff..probably the same jars from my childhood!!!

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    1. Can't see fluffernutters becoming big in France.

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