Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Advice sought.

Advice sought from those who have had female dogs with double back leg ligament tears.

If there is no strength in the back legs how do you get a female dog to stoop ? Sophie widdled in her pen last night but no sign of poops. 

We're holding her rear end with a towel but she doesn't seem keen to have a bowel movement. She tries then collapses on the ground. This is both upsetting and presumably unhealthy.
We've tried ten times today but no luck.

Warm bed baths don't seem to trigger any reflex

Thoughts please.

31 comments:

  1. Hi there. We've no experience of this particular problem. I've done a quick search online though and this forum seemed quite useful. http://handicappedpet.net/helppets/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15025
    Really hope you are able to solve the problem and Sophie is more comfortable. Amanda, Harris & Horatio!

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    1. Thank you for the link. The vet says there's no point in rushing these things. Wish I could be so relaxed.

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  2. Maybe a light laxative . Carry her out to where she usually goes and set her down.. It's all about re training her now. My heart goes out to you all

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    1. You're right. It's getting her into a new routine.

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  3. Replies
    1. Maybe a little yogurt would do the same thing - although we're trying to get her weight down before the operation(s)

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  4. Perhaps the vet will be able to advise you on the best way to handle Sophie?
    Have just consulted my dog book, which doesn't give any information about a mature dog with back ligament tears, but gives advice for relieving constipation in puppies - a variation of which may help Sophie.
    The book suggests - 1) "use a stubby bulb thermometer to introduce petroleum jelly around and into the anus" or - 2) "a drop of liquid paraffin or sunflower oil given either in food, or directly, until bowel movements return to normal". It also says that if there is no improvement after 24 hours, consult a vet.
    Perhaps Sophie has to become accustomed to being held up, and the different position may be making her anxious. Hopefully things will be back to normal once she is used to the fact that she can't manage on her own.

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    1. Came outside to find she'd disppeared. Found her in the peony border behind the well. She must have dragged herself over. Perhaps she was wanting some privacy. As they say a watched pot never boils.

      True to say this is a big relief - all round.

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  5. Good luck with everything. You, and Sophie, have my sincere sympathy and best wishes!

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  6. Oh dear, I've no direct experience of this sort of thing, but some sort of laxative, and moist food rather than dry kibble might help her bowel movements?

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  7. Had the same problem with our old English sheepdog .Support Sophie with a towel but she must be able to squat. Above all, do not stress - when she has to "go ", she will.

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    1. It's taken 60 hours but she's done it her way.

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  8. I had a 15 year old collie ( MALE ) that could not stand with his hind legs. I would straddle him, facing his tail. I would place my hands on either side of his rump, physically holding up his hind end. It would take a few minutes, but he would have a bowel movement. I would softly talk to him the entire time I was holding him. Maybe if you could do this, while the Font was in front of Sophie talking to her, and holding her by the collar with one hand, and petting her head with the other hand. I think the towel is spooking her. Hope this helps some.

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    1. Sophie is more than happy to have long conversations with both of us but sadly will not take the hint.

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  9. I had a dog with a spinal injury so that she couldn't stand. Solid food just clogs up the inner works, so wet and/or mostly liquid. It makes for a messy end result but does relieve blockages.
    Someone earlier mentioned incontinence pads. Puppy training pads are good, if there's some kind of chain pet store available -- you can just bundle them up and dispose. Makes your life easier.
    Poor Sophie. I am so sorry for all the denizens of the ROF, but you will get through this.

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    1. Puppy training pads - a great idea.

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  10. Hi,

    I bred basset hounds and often took in elderly ones. I had a couple who had spinal injuries. what i found with them was light swimming every day. I used to go to a pool owned by some greyhound people and all the trainers were wonderful with these rather chubby short legged creature and I was able to get them up again. This is something I would try post recovery with your lass if your vet thinks that this is a good idea. I must say that my dogs had olive oil in their food every day. This may help with the toileting issues at the moment. All the best and hugs and cuddles to the children. Their tales brighten my day.

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    1. Thank you for the olive oil idea. She's not constipated yet but a good idea for after the operation.

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  11. We had a Lhasa Apso with Cushing's Disease whose back legs became
    very weak and stooping was a problem for him. We just tried to steady him with our hands long enough to allow him to go. A neighbor with an elderly Black Lab also used a towel to hold her steady. I don't know how but she also held a shovel under her butt for ease of removal. Good luck!

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    1. A towel and a shovel ? We're finding the towel part difficult enough !

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  12. Oh,poor Sophs! I am just heartsick. Maybe a phone consult with a Stateside vet facility or a teaching university could shed some light? Perhaps France Profonde may be somewhat behind in new technologies. Here is a clinic that looked very comprehensive and cutting edge to me but it's in Maryland: http://www.vosm.com/about (Veterinary Orthopedic Sports Medicine Group). Watch their video. Also perhaps a group that works with disabled pets could give advice? Surely the pottying issue can be somehow easily solved? This is all so sudden, a diva needs some time to come to terms. After watching all your struggles with Wilfee, my heart breaks to see this sort of thing happening again for these new babies. Much love to you all. I will keep searching for ideas.

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    1. Thankfully, the diva just needed some time.

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  13. We haven't faced this issue ourselves, but I looked at a couple of sites including this one: http://handicappedpet.net/helppets/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15025 and a number of people swear that a strategically applied ice cube will trigger the poop reflex.

    Good luck!

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    1. Thank you. The ice cube trick may yet find a place in the PON owners manual !

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  14. I am so sorry to hear about Sophie. I am struggling here too with mine who is now bedridden and poops and pees where he is.. on the incontinence pads.
    He still barks and have a great appetite and says its not his time yet. He has cancer.

    What i do to make him poo is to stimulate the anal area with a wet tissue. He usually poos after that.
    You can try a lil bit of laxative from vet. Pumpkin in food helps... and add some coconut oil in her meals.

    http://www.handicappedpets.com/bowel-management-in-incontinent-pets

    It is very hard and a trying time for you guys. But it is important that what goes in must come out too. Else she will be clogged up.

    Hope she will get used to the towel to hold her up and to assist her in her pooing. She will get better soon. Hang in there.

    Ours is just on his last lap. He will tell us when he is ready to go.

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    1. As with all things give it enough time and it'll work itself out.

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  15. A small amount of canned pumpkin. This was particularly useful after surgeries with our dogs. Also, once our dogs got into a routine, things started to even out.

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  16. A small amount of canned pumpkin. This was particularly useful after surgeries with our dogs. Also, once our dogs got into a routine, things started to even out.

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