Wednesday, December 21, 2016

The most ironic statement of the year.


The effect of the Berlin attack already being felt. Six young soldiers patrolling the streets of the little market town. They're armed to the teeth but are laughing and relaxed as only eighteen year olds can be. At eight in the morning are they finishing a night patrol or starting a morning one ? Angus is shocked at the sight of rifle wielding soldiers on the streets but the French seem relaxed about their presence. '' It's Christmas " says the bakers wife with unintended irony. Upon reflection, her comment is probably the most ironic thing I've heard all year, or quite possibly, ever. 


The supermarket has put up a sign saying that bags must be checked due to the state of emergency.


Good news on Sophie's first leg which has healed beautifully. She's 80% there.

Less good news on the second leg. There's a fracture in it. In the month since the operation she's managed to split the bone. The fracture has already started to heal so there's no need for another operation. Just another two months of careful monitoring. The surgeon says ' This often happens when owners are more relaxed - a dog will put their full weight on the leg and 'bam' there it goes without anyone knowing ''. We are at a complete loss to how or when it could have happened. 24/7, 360 degree monitoring is clearly not sufficient for the family diva.


Sophie is oblivious to the diagnosis.


She just wants to roam free and savage her brother.


There will be a new 'final' X-ray in a months time.

Just a record of those little things about life with a dog that make life, life.

In an obscure textbook on Anglo-Turkish relations Angus finds the sentence ' Churchill met President Inonu in a railway carriage outside Adana but lost his temper over the subtlety of the dubitative tense in Turkish ". The writing style may explain the authors ( and the subjects ) obscurity.




22 comments:

  1. DARN! Darn, darn! Groan! At least is seems she is not in pain with it, and thank goodness doesn't need surgery. And just how is an owner supposed to explain to the dog that she may only put partial weight on the leg???? Is that a "woof, woof, growl" or a "Growl, woof, woof"??

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    1. Not the result we were hoping for. I guess the problem is that after two months enforced idleness you have to keep a dog absolutely still to stop it putting its weight on the weak leg. How you manage that is the conundrum.

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  2. Sophie is irrepressible. It doesn’t seem possible that you might have been even more vigilant. This is disappointing of course but thank goodness further surgery isn’t on the list.
    I’m reading Jon Meacham’s “Franklin and Winston” (mercifully the writing is less obscure than what you quote). Churchill always fascinates.

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    1. All we have to do to stop the fracture reappearing is to keep her still and quiet. After two months that's easier said than done. As your reading matter shows both were mercurial characters.

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  3. Poor Sophie, and poor you. Difficult to know how you can be any more vigilant than you already are. It can't be much of an inconvenience to her, if she's ready to savage her brother. Good to know that the first leg has healed so well. She'll have to learn to hop !

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    1. Brother savaging is on hold again.

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  4. Oh dear Sophie, you will get there in the end. Meanwhile, I might have just a bit less than "relaxed" about the implied criticism in the surgeon's statement about "relaxed owners"!
    Cheers, Gail (who confesses to having been previously unaware of such a thing as a dubitative tense but is now going to google it).

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    1. Fingers crossed she doesn't do any more illicit leaping in the next month.

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  5. They can't put a cast or brace or something that would inhibit her from putting weight on the leg?
    Also very intrigued by the dubitative tense, but I, too, undoubtedly would have lost my patience.

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  6. I know that feeling you had in seeing the "rifle wielding soldiers." It's like another world has "intruded" upon the security of your own.


    Sorry to read about Sophie. Interestingly enough there is another Goldendoodle for the rescue also having knee surgery. The concern for "fractures" has plagued this particular foster home because of the softness and lack of bone density that was realized after her first surgery. Could this perhaps be the same issue for Sophie? It was mentioned to me about Max because one of the screws in his knee was put in at a slight angle because of the same thing.

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  7. Sophie seems so young to,be having these problems. Is this something to do,with her breed? I wish you all peace and healing. You've certainly been through it this year. At a parking lot downtown, they had a sign that said, "Happy Holidays, Lock your car doors".

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    1. Not related to the breed. She might have been running and jumping on an uneven ground (mole hills, jumping off the table) and that's how she broke her bones. It's something that's difficult to control when it comes to active dogs. Hopefully once the bones heal they will be stronger.

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  8. I fractured the bone in my upper right arm. The Doctor asked if it hurt. Only when I do this, I replied. Well, don't do that, was his answer. Now, explain to Sophie to only walk on her front legs!

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  9. Phooey. I was hoping for a bit better news on the leg. Fingers crossed it will not reappear and that the "final" x-ray brings joyous news.

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  10. I completely understand how difficult it is to keep a determined dog like Sophie still. My own PONette is also very independent and wouldn't be happy in a cage.

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  11. Dubitative? And I thought the world could hold nothing more obscure than the pluperfect subjunctive.
    Poor Sophie. Poor you. Would calcium-magnesium supplementation help, I wonder.

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  12. Was that book translated by a computer program, perhaps?

    Cannot believe the bone split. No words.

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  13. I've seen some dogs whose back legs are paralyzed and are strapped to a doggie harness which has two wheels. Hard to explain but it would prevent her back legs from touching the ground. Might help, or not

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  14. We feel Sophie's pain. Our dog that had the hip surgery broke her leg "around the hip implant in a spiral". This was one day after the surgeon pronounced her ready to live her old life before the hip problem....no leash or restraint. Another surgery to stabilize it followed. And another long recovery period. Prayers to the ROF....if I knew where to send booze, I'd send that as well :)
    Pam in NH

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  15. Oh dear that's such a shame. She is a little trooper though. Broken bones are painful. I can speak with some authority on this topic as am currently sitting with foot elevated due to a broken fibula at ankle level that I got by stepping into a hole hidden by grass while walking the dogs. Though I suppose a broken bone is no more painful than that big op. How wonderful that the bone has already begun to heal.

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  16. Rather unexpected and upsetting news. Will this development affect the final outcome of Sophie's procedure? Had to have been painful for her. What an amazing dog!

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