Friday, April 21, 2017

It's bound to get interesting soon.


The mercury showing a chilly 2 degrees this morning. Bob and Sophie wake full of energy. Blue, completely cloudless skies and cold temperatures triggering something in their DNA that says this is PON weather. They head down the hill noses close to the ground, tails waving. Their master follows on more sedately. Thankfully, they pause to observe the cows in the field by the stream which enables me to catch up.


Back home they follow me round the garden.



Today is a day for synchronised garden watching. Bob adopts his '' Sophie just you watch. It's bound to get interesting soon " attitude. Sophie has a lower boredom threshold than her brother and wanders off for a doze in the rose border.


To the bakers for some fresh meringue. A dinner at the Hayes Street Grill reminded us that fresh meringue, fresh strawberries and some home made butter milk ice cream is as good as it gets. Bob and Sophie discover meringue crumbs. From their enthusiasm it can be safely assumed that they think this has developed into the best day ever.


The butchers counter showcasing goat. I'd never thought of goat as a French thing. The duo are hurried by.



Henry Kissinger writes these two paragraphs about Jared Kushner in this weeks Time magazine. Perhaps it's the allusion to Icarus that makes me think this is diplomatic language at its most opaque. It is a masterpiece of obfuscation. You may need to scroll down: 



17 comments:

  1. Fresh meringue, fresh strawberries, and home made buttermilk ice cream (can we have the recipe perhaps?) would certainly form part of my Best Day Ever.
    Cheers!
    Gail.

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    1. Buttermilk Ice Cream

      1 quart size
      ...............................................................................................

      1 3/4 cup heavy cream

      1/2 cup granulated sugar

      3 tablespoons honey

      1 1/4 cup buttermilk

      1 tablespoon bourbon

      strawberries and a bit of granulated sugar for topping

      In a small saucepan, warm the cream over low heat with the sugar and honey until the sugar is completely dissolved. Place the mixture in a bowl and refrigerate until chilled through, 6 to 8 hours.

      Stir the buttermilk and bourbon into the chilled sweetened cream. Freeze . Churn for 30 minutes, transfer ice cream to a freezer-safe container and freeze overnight, or until firm enough to scoop.

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  2. Yes, please share the buttermilk ice cream recipe!
    This weather is beyond beautiful, but it worries me. No rain for weeks. The new tendrils on the grape vines are all shriveled and wilted.

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    Replies
    1. The neighbouring farmers fear that we are about to face the mother of all droughts seems to be coming true. The water is on the laurel hesdge every night. Thankfully, the village has two large lakes so hopefully above a hosepipe ban we won't have any interruptions to our supply

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  3. Even mid-winter, we rarely get down to 2 degrees.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Bella Roxi& Macdui I know you live in Australia but where? it sounds quite mild We are in NSW and get to -7 .7 on some winter mornings.

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  4. Thank you so much for the Buttermilk ice cream recipe. I totally agree with Gail and Bertie. This would be the best day ever. A real treat. Incredibly sli8mming of course

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  5. Joy overload - we'll diet tomorrow ! That meringue looks home-made - unlike the rather whiter than white dry ones we see here. Fresh raspberries would make it another best day ever too.
    Lovely photos of the PONs.

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  6. Your ceanothus seems to be thriving. Surely the only reason Time even published that silly piece is because Kissinger was the author. Unfortunately, Jared isn't the only person acquainted with the President's intangibles.

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  7. The meringue sounds amazing. Henry the K sounds even more inscrutable than usual. But with him, it's hard to tell.

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  8. What a lovely picture of the PONs in front of that bush! What kind of bush is that - such a wonderful blue color! Here on the Canadian prairies 2 degrees is summer in April.

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    Replies
    1. It's a Ceanothus, and it really is a glorious shade of blue.

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  9. I have fond memories of the Hayes Street Grill; I haven’t been there since moving from San Francisco to a more remote corner of the California coast.
    I hurried by the butcher’s display, too.

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  10. I thought his Icarus image captured the situation perfectly!

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    Replies
    1. A truly wonderful piece of prose. Like an onion there are more and more layers that can be peeled off !

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    2. Seems a lot of more fluent observers have thought the same thing : http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/04/jared-kushner-henry-kissinger-time-100

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