Sunday, July 30, 2017

A quiet Sunday.


It's going to be a hot one. The air already heavy and humid as Angus sets off with Sophie down the old ox track to the stream. There have been wild boar about in the night. The soil scuffed and rutted. Sophie stops to sniff their scent and savour something they've left behind. She fishes, inelegantly, for minnows by the waterfall. Every so often she lunges into the water, generating a bow wave, getting herself wet and leaving the minnows unperturbed. She shrieks, presumably with happiness but possibly in frustration, or a combination of the two, then repeats the process. Refraction like perspective a concept that takes some getting used to.


On the way home Sophie positively bounds up the hill that leads to The Rickety Old Farmhouse's kitchen door. Every so often she stops, looks back and waits for her owner to catch up. She exhibits studied impatience.


At the top of the hill, before heading indoors, Angus sits and takes in the view.


The sunflowers at their best. The perfect reason for a brief pause. 



Sophie is keen to get home and have breakfast. Her brother who has been for a power walk round the lake joins her.


This poem is very beautiful :

12 comments:

  1. Studied impatience. I can almost hear Sophie saying "oh Angus, COME ON!"

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  2. Hari OM
    You are skilled in the art of being-ness, Sophie. I suspect Angus of the same... YAM xx

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  3. Yes, a beautiful poem. As is the one by commenter Stuart. Here in the US, hares are usually called jack rabbits, I believe, and are most often found in the desert.
    One could never tire of your view of the hills especially now that they are golden with sunflowers.

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    1. Yes, the other poem in the comments is elegaic in its simplicity. Beauty begets beauty.

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  4. That's a beautiful blog, and her work is spectacular. I looked at her list for a year of reading and was struck by how few of those titles got any play in the U.S. Such very different markets.

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    1. Some wonderful art is to be found in the illustrations for 'childrens' books. With obvious exceptions this seems to be a local market - perhaps different countries have different ideas of what's right for the young.

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    2. I just ordered the book The Lost Words, a collaboration between Jackie Morris and Robert MacFarlane. An interesting story of how this came about can be found on her website. The book is their response to words being culled from the Oxford University Press Junior Dictionary (words including bluebell, heron, otter, dandelion, acorn, and kingfisher). As she notes, it’s not necessarily a book for children, but “for all ages.”

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  5. Such telling pictures, along with descriptive words and beautiful thoughts, for a Sunday morning. Thank you.

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  6. Thank you for the "brief pause" of the sunflower fields! Stunning! Sorry Sophie, it was worth the delay before breakfast. ;)

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  7. Thank you for your daily post and thank you for the link to the artist Jackie. Such a beautiful piece and response.
    Vancouver Barbara

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  8. Thank you for the particularly beautiful pictures and what you have written today plus the link to Jackie Morris and her art. All deeply satisfying.

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  9. Bob's country at it's very best - worth a pause - even if it did delay Sophie's breakfast !

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