Thursday, July 6, 2017

Read the book.


'' Intelligent with a good memory, agile and diligent, and especially calm and gentle. An ideal dog for apartment dwellers. "


Angus reads the description in the dog book, turns to look at his companion, who is currently chasing a non-existent squirrel, and wonders if the author of the article on Polish Lowland Sheepdogs has ever actually met one.


Sophie joins 'The Font' in the kitchen. Bob is loaded, noisily, into the back of the car in readiness for our morning visit to the bakers.  When we get there he tries to walk through the closed shop door rather than wait for it to be opened. This might best be described as a demonstration of 'understated intelligence'.


Bob gives the attractive young lady behind the bakers counter his best heart throb routine. This entails him sitting staring, unblinkingly, at her until she gets the message that he'd like some choux pastry. He gets some. The dog book needs to add 'charm' to its list of PON virtues.


We eye up a pineapple cake in the window but settle on two coffee eclairs for lunch.



18 comments:

  1. Lisa and (the apartment-dwelling) Cherry in TokyoJuly 6, 2017 at 6:46 AM

    Well, I'd certainly go along with "good memory" and "diligent," as in remembering where food might be and diligently pursuing it!

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    1. And the ability to recognize the word 'lunch' in at least 84 languages !

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  3. Successful communication of a desire for choux pastry counts as intelligence in my book.
    Toodle pip!
    Bertie.
    PS from Gail: Bertie's behaviour also confounds the books - every single WFT description I've read involves some some of a warning about barking, but inside the house and out on walks, Bertie is almost completely silent (he does bark in the garden).

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  4. Bob has such a handsome face, and we can well imagine that he has become very adept at thought transference, if his success with the choux crumbs is anything to go by ! Does it mention that in the book too?

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    1. It's thought transference - a PON speciality.

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  5. But Bob has held up his end in many a discussion of geopolitics, held on the drainpipe seat.

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    1. Nothing quite as sage as a PON companion. Everything in the world is put in perspective when you have a shaggy dog next to you on a storm drain.

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  6. These cakes looks so delicious !

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  7. The part about apartment dwelling was surely written tongue-in-cheek. Sweet pictures of Bob.
    I’d still be standing at the baker’s display trying to settle on something. Perhaps closing my eyes and pointing would work.

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    1. Written tongue in cheek ? Rather like a guide book to NY telling you to chat away to locals on the subway.

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  8. Obviously a good memory, he always remembers where he gets treats and intelligent when it comes to using his calm gentleness to score more. However, apartment living....no hedges to hide toys....no one arriving to throw them...sounds very restrictive.

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    1. Perfect memory when it comes to food - not so good on just about everything else..

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  9. You could be right about author who wrote the article on PON's. I have a friend who has written several dog books. She was asked by her publisher a few years ago to do one on beagles. She's always had Goldens, and never had beagles. But of course she did a lot of research and wrote the book and when it was published, it did pretty well, and is still being printed. Go figure.

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    1. There must be a few apartment living PON owners out there who are wondering what happened.

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  10. Gosh those strawberry tarts look the business.

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