Tuesday, January 26, 2016

No darkness here.


At the crossroads on the edge of the village the first of the daffodils make an appearance.


We pass a team of workmen taking the down the glass covers on the street lights. They wash the glass and replace the bulbs. Bob christens the tyres on their truck. 


The workmen due to build the raised zebra crossing still haven't shown up. The mechanical digger remains parked by the churchyard. Madame Bay says the work on the new crossing was due to have finished last Friday.


Bob and Sophie are oblivious to the uncertainties of village life. In fact Bob and Sophie are oblivious to all uncertainties. Walks are taken, trips in the car made, food consumed, blackbirds chased, tickles received. To round off their day Lamb on a rope is savaged then hidden in the laurel hedge.

Night falls but it doesn't get dark. The Old Farmers star on a pole continues to provide guidance to pilots descending towards Toulouse. The strings of Christmas lights around his gutters continue to shine. In the village hall window the garlands of gaudily coloured bulbs twinkle. Above it all the brightest of full moons. Here in deepest, deepest France profonde the festive illuminations are alive and well. 


For Burns Night someone asked what was the most Scottish of all songs. This might just be it : 



15 comments:

  1. Those lights are indeed bright. Is the concept of Twelfth Night known in France?
    And daffodils already? If this year's strange weather continues, we may be seeing them in Scotland soon too. 17ºC as I drove through Elgin on Sunday afternoon.
    Cheers, Gail.

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  2. Another fun-packed day at the ROF.
    The moon looks as though it's part of the Old Farmer's illuminations. We wonder who's paying his electricity bill?

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  3. Dear ANGUS: We have just played your beautiful 'most-Scottish-of-all-songs' FEAR A'BHATA sung by Karen Matheson. We played it to
    our most dignified and stoic Scottish Terrier - VICTOR - and he is rapt with attention, silent in appreciation. We just now asked him if
    he understood Gaelic - we are sure he does. These Scotties hold many many secrets. We have shared out lives with them for over
    forty years. Once a Scottish Terrier owner - always so. Thanks for the stirring haunting beautiful song for Burns Night. Cheers from the Westcoast of Canada.

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    1. oops - typo! Meant to say "shared OUR lives with them" for over forty years. Cheers once again.

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    2. Bob and Sophie seem to understand Polish so a Scottie certainly understands the 'auld tongue'.

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  4. Beautiful shot of the moon and the festive lights! Thank you for sharing that beautiful song. She has an incredibly lovely voice! We had our Burns Night dinner on Saturday (combo of a family birthday and Bard's birthday). Wish I would have had this to play!

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    1. Belated congratulations on the family birthday !

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  5. Oh, for a life filled with only lovely certainties . . . The light in the second picture is very beautiful.

    We have many cheerful daffodils coming into bloom on our property on the Northern California coast. An early spring.

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  6. Oblivious to uncertainties can be bliss. Hope the daffodils aren't surprised by a late winter.

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    1. The daffodils may yet discover the uncertainties of the climate !

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  7. Either the moon or the Old Farmer's lights is casting a most interesting shadow on the wall at the left of your picture. The ghost of Christmas past? The spirit of France Profonde?
    That's a beautiful song, thank you for sharing it.

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  8. All day I have pondered the thought of workmen taking down the glass globes on street lights. Washing the globes, changing out the bulbs, and replacing the clean globes. What a service, and pride of community this is!

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