Monday, May 8, 2017

“As is a tale, so is life: not how long it is, but how good it is, is what matters.”


We're up early. Angus is on the phone to Chinese men in dark suits to tell them that French voters have decided it's foolhardy to believe simple answers.Sophie is out in the garden glaring at the collared doves. When they land on the driveway she throws her head back, lets out a diva howl and chases after them. She may not catch them but she knows that “As is a tale, so is life: not how long it is, but how good it is, is what matters.”


Bob watches his sister in bemused silence.


We set off across the village green just as the last school bus has gone. The buses pick up the big ones at seven, the medium sized ones ( gate rattling little tike included ) at seven fifteen and the little ones at seven twenty. Small faces press their noses up against the bus window and wave as we head across the grass.


No surprise in last nights election result. 46 villagers voted for Macron, 34 for Le Pen and 6 spoiled their papers. I see the mayor as he's locking up the town hall. Seems it's not the pensioners who have voted for Le Pen but the young farmers with families. The new President has a lot of work to do.


A shaggy pony and a slightly less shaggy horse have taken up residence in the grassed over moat behind the town hall. Sophie glares at these new residents. For a moment I fear she might let out another howl of disapproval but she opts for silent disdain. We watch a young Nuthatch - a thing of feathered beauty - learning to climb a tree trunk up and down, down and up while its mother looks on. The mother trills in delight.


So starts another day in deepest, deepest France profonde. 




10 comments:

  1. Bob's country is beautiful - let's hope it remains that way in the years to come.

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  2. That Macron's 2nd round victory was emphatic seems to me a good thing. One wonders how the Chinese view the result. Although Radio 4 joined forces with the BBC World Service for a 'French election special' as I was driving back from the west coast yesterday evening, this aspect was not covered. I also find myself wondering how secret is the ballot in your corner of France Profonde!
    Sending ear rubs to Bob and Sophie.
    Cheerrs, Gail.

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    1. The villagers make their political preferences plain to anyone who will listen. The mayor hears ( and sees ) all.

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  3. The fact that Macron won by 31 percentage points rather than the 20 predicted is good.
    Now let's hope the extremists don't get far in the legislative races. As I heard the cannon shot this morning at the war memorial, I thought, not enough people today know war or Nazism, and they imagine it too lightly.

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  4. Now the Chinese have the South Korean election to think about on Tuesday. The Trump administration will be paying close attention, one hopes. Then it's Iran on the 19th followed by the UK on June 8. Here in the US we have several special Congressional elections coming up which could be an indication of things to come. At least the Macron victory is being celebrated by most of the world, thank goodness.

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  5. Huge sigh of relief here among so many. The alternative would have been terrifying. But now all the subsequent elections to worry about...lots of conversations with Chinese men in dark suits???

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    1. South Korea tomorrow, then Germany and the problem one ( where it could all go wrong ) in March .... Italy

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  6. Ahhhh, the good old days, when one only thought about one's own country's election. It would be a good change if everyone could work for the common good instead of personal power. Alas..... don't see that happening in the near future. Especially, as many view success as how much money and stuff one owns.

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  7. France chose the high road in electing their nations leader. But I can't help but think that even though Le Pen lost, the fact that she got as far as she did said something.

    Good luck with the men in dark suits!

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    1. The headline figure says he won 65% of the vote. Adjusting for abstentions and spoiled papers that number falls to 44%.

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