Thursday, October 6, 2016

Not the plan.


After the failure of the soft blue cone we try out a German product. It certainly looks the part. Wearing it Sophie has something of the air of a figure in a Velasquez painting. A Spanish court princess. 

All does not go according to plan.The Teutonic solution is soft, and as we discover surprisingly pliable. Sophie manages to lie on her back, pull down the rim with her front paws and nibble at the bandages. She is oblivious to the protective black ring around her neck. The instructions tell us this is impossible.

A trip to the French teacher to borrow a plastic cone. Uncomfortable and unyielding. Sophie does not like it. We go to bed with those famous dog owners words ' She'll get used to it and soon fall asleep '. This truism never applied to previous generations of PONs . It certainly does not apply to Sophie. Angus comes downstairs at two to stop the howling and removes what's left of the cone. The black ring is put back on. By this time she's so tired she falls asleep. In five minutes her master will also be asleep.

The stitches cannot come out a moment too soon.

Just one of those dog days too unimportant to be recorded in a diary but commented on here as a reminder that sensible people ( or at least those who want a restful night ) own cats.










35 comments:

  1. Sophie - you look like royalty. Hang in dar girl and try not to bang into too many walls.
    Wags & Hugs,
    Ranger

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    1. I'll tell her she looks like royalty. It'll make it all so much easier !

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  2. Velasquez never painted a more beautiful princess!!! Don't you wish at these moments that we could explain to our dear furry angels why we must do certain things and why they must follow our instructions? And of course they would obediently respond, of course, we understand. xxx

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  3. Ah, Angus, "These are the times that try men's souls...". Cats aren't much easier really, when they are sick - I am a cat owner and have had many trying times. But Sophie really takes the proverbial cake. Too clever for her own good. Love and hope for some sleep being sent to you all.

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  4. Our CC used his plastic cone as a weapon. When we saw him coming we would get out of his way! He would sling his head from side to side, clobbering us in the process. He would run it into furniture to make it more playable. I'm afraid Sophie is outsmarting us all!

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  5. Oh dear, Sophie must be finding those stitches uncomfortable. Is there anything that can be done to relieve the itching?

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    1. Only 4 more days and then the stitches come out. When said like that it doesn't sound so bad.

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  6. Poor Sophie - she must be so fed up. What a pity they don't make those rigid plastic cones to fit round the middle - rather like a long skirt...it might take her a little longer to work her way out of one. Wonder how she'd deal with a plaster cast - oh, she'd eat it, wouldn't she ! One of our dogs used his plastic cone as a battering ram - we still bear the scars, and the walls and doors were never the same.

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    1. Previous generations of PONs have been batteres. Sophie is more of a head banger.

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  7. The Fresh Air podcast/radio show just did an episode on how dogs perceive the world through smell. You would enjoy it. Here is a link to the summary, and you can get to the audio show as well: http://www.npr.org/2016/10/04/496417068/from-fire-hydrants-to-rescue-work-dogs-perceive-the-world-through-smell
    Today's show has an interview with Bruce Springsteen. The prospect of listening to it is enough to make me look forward to my run this morning.

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  8. Oh dear. And yes, cats are just as 'determined'. One of mine managed to get out through the cat flap while wearing her collar.

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  9. "The instructions tell us this is impossible."...Sophie has laughed at those words.
    Oh what a darling clever girl, I am loving her more and more each dear...I love a Diva rebel.
    Sorry you have to replace the French teacher's cone, but I'm sure she'll understand if she knows anything about Sophie.

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    1. As I've said before if she was human she'd be on the back of a Harley drinking a beer from the bottle.

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    2. Now we have had this conversation before. You are just sleep deprived! Sophie would not be that bad. She would want her own Harley!

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    3. Will someone more skilled with Photoshop please make up this picture?
      "As I've said before if she was human she'd be on the back of a Harley drinking a beer from the bottle."
      Sophie, the Wild One.

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  10. Frequently the "cone of shame" is not deep enough and the animals mouth can reach the edge. It needs to extend well beyond . Ask your vet to fit a cone. That may help...or maybe not. Hang in there.

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    1. If the black collar doesn't work tonight we'll go and get a better plastic cone.

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  11. My cat ended up wearing her plastic cone around her middle - over the top of her stitches. Ouch!

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    1. Sophie's plastic cone came from a Labrador household. We might want to downsize.

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  12. Alas a cat is no guarantee of a good nights sleep, especially one who climbs all over you all night or likes to come in and check if you are awake at 1am or 5am, or to tell you it is raining, or for you to get up to feed her when her bowl is full of biscuits already.

    We hope that the stitches will be removed soon so that you might all get some sleep and life will resume as normal.

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    1. Tuesday morning can't come soon enough.

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  13. Sophie has always had a mind of her own.
    It is easier to treat a sick dog than a cat any day.
    Hope today will be better for all of you.

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  14. Sophie being especially Sophie-like :-)
    We stiffened our plastic collar with several layers of duct tape to cushion all sharp edges. Softer on the dog neck and backs of human legs, as well as woodwork. It cushions the sibling dogs and kids when the cones crash into them (before they learn to get out of the way) but also stiffens the edge of the cone so the healing dog can't bend it easily. I wonder if the plastic cones can be doubled (2 cones) then taped together for "Anti-Sophie shenanigans" strength? Our vet also uses gauze to tie the cone on...soft on the neck. If a doubled hard plastic collar doesn't work....2 words....Night Nurse. :-)
    Love and restful wishes to all at the ROF. You are all in our thoughts.
    Kisses to the sweet PONS. Bob is the BEST little boy! Pam in NH

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    1. We've worked on the black pliable cone . Here's hoping.

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  15. If one doesn’t mind the hissing matches that build to throaty growling, or sound of breaking glass from toppled flower vases (water running everywhere) or scampering back and forth on the piano keyboard in the middle of the night, well then, yes, cats will not disturb sleep.

    The wheels in Sophie’s mind never cease to turn.

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    1. She is quite different from a placid male PON.

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  16. P.S. Even Sophie's expression is perfect for a Velasquez.

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  17. The new collar will join the pile of 'tough' dog toys and other 'indestructible' objects.

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  18. Oh, Angus, as you know, the big plastic e-collar is the one "sure thing" and it appears that even that is no match for a determined Diva! I hope a solution is found - I have to admit that I've "doubled" e-collars a time or two, but I doubt this would even be a viable solution for Sophie. I'll be interested to hear what solution is found, if there is one!

    Also thanks for comment on a previous post -- I had to chuckle at Sophie's run and leap for freedom via the post lady. We may be half-a-world apart, but there is no doubt that we are on the same road, but you're just in the fast lane! I'm so glad the harness is working for Sophie! I hope that maybe the vets office will remember it as well, and recommend it to other dogs like Sophie and Max, and Josh and Jake too. I wonder if when the person who originally designed it for his dog, simply because he wanted to take his dog with him, and couldn't because of mobility challenges, had any idea it would be used in a little village in France?

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